Wednesday, March 18, 2015

Crochet mistakes


One of the things I struggle the most with in crochet is straight edges. Especially when there are different stitches involved. You really have to stay on top of your stitches and count, count, count... The good thing with crochet though is that it doesn't always have to be perfect. No, unlike knitting or embroidery a lost stitch or two is hardly noticeable most of the time.

This loss of not less than 8 stitches (!!! Oh may gosh! I think I was watching a good movie...) was a hard digested discovery... Initially I wanted to frog it but then I realized that naaahhh, it might not be necessary. This is a back piece of a Popcorn & Lace Pillow and with some blocking I can use it as it is. With its wobbly edge and all. And you know what? No one would ever guess the mistake once I have pieced front and back together. A hidden mistake and the pillow stays as beautiful as it could be. That is one reason I love crochet. There are always short cuts and tricks to hide all those small - or big - crochet mistakes of yours.

Kärlek
Annette

Note: Find my How To Crochet A Straight Edge Tutorial here.
Note 2: Find the Popcorn & Lace Pillow pattern here.



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22 comments :

  1. A neat idea, I'm always going wrong when I watch television at the same time. CJ xx

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  2. I don't use the turning ch as a stitch but just as a way to get height. So I will do a couple of ch at the end of a row, turn and then do my first treble or half-treble (UK terms).This way I always have a 'proper' stitch to work into when I come to the end of a row and avoid 'losing' stitches...

    Penny
    x

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  3. Love reading your blog... I agree edges can be a tricky thing, but as you say they can be hidden . Love your work and pic of your home in Europe.xx

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  4. You are not the only one who has this problem. Without counting stitches can disappear without you noticing it. Great that you still can use this crochet work after blocking.

    Have a nice day, Margaret

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  5. I get wonky edges when I'm doing any stitch other than straight doubles or trebles. I finally mastered it after lots of head scratching and weird shaped scarves and baby blankets! I didn't used to mind too much, as the people I was giving these things to new nothing about crochet so they wouldn't know it was wrong!! ha! Terrible really!. But any other stitch and I'm wonky as they come! I recently tried Attic 24 Granny stripe blanket and fell prey to wonky edge syndrome! Still don't know how to get it right! We could do with a good tutorial on straight edges couldn't we? The popcorn lace pillow looks beautiful, I'm sure it will all fit together just fine and will be lovely:)

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  6. I know what you mean, I have the same problem with crochet all the time, even with the simple stitches. Its always good to be able to hide those mistakes on projects that don't require a perfect fit. Your crochet looks lovely.

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  7. I have just had exactly the same!! I am making a ripple crochet front cushion cover and baking it with fabric. I too have gone in a bit and thought to frog and did just as you did. I said 'nah', carried on and with blocking and sewing no one will notice! Hugs to you x

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  8. I'm so with you on that! I have now been crocheting for 6 years, and I still find turning and stitch placement a pain. The hardest though for me, is crocheting and joining together to form a round and then making rounds on top of that. I NEVER seem to get the stitches right first go. I always have too many or too few, then the seam seems so obvious it looks annoyingly awful! I keep meaning to spend a good few hours just having a go to find out the best way to do it. I'm sure there must be tutorials online. I just need more time in the day! argghhhhhhh!

    Have a super week my friend xxxxx

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  9. I can relate, and agree that crochet is very forgiving. My lasted project has involved some ripping for not keeping count, since it was a stand along piece and the mistakes would stand out (a triangle scarf). I too 'cannibalize' one project to finish another sometimes. ; o

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    Replies
    1. Hi Angela,
      THAT sounds like a nightmare. There is nothing more frustrating than having to frog something far into the project to re-do a big part of it. I hope it came out well in the end. Thanks for visiting.
      Xxx

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  10. Ha ha haaa see, you are not alone? I use the term"blocking into submission". But then I also find Lucy's (Attic 24) tutorials on straight edges very helpful :-)

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  11. We all do those counting misstakes. Stright lines are not my friend, but maybe after I have read your tutorial?
    I have link up party at my blog, today and tomorrow. You are welcom to share :)
    Have a nice day

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    Replies
    1. Hi Monica
      Thank you for popping in. I'll pop over to yours and have a look at your Link Up party.
      Xxx

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  12. I often think "simple" patterns have much more chance of error!

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  13. oh yes, definitely crochet over knitting, you can hide your mistakes so much more easily! x

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  14. My first few blankets were WAY off rectangular, getting better at it now

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  15. Hi Annette, You are so right, good TV shows often make my crochet go wonky tonk! Haha.
    Loved your snowy skiing pics.
    Have a lovely day.

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  16. try something called "Standing Double Crochet" stitch.. lots of videos and info online. Moogly has a really good explanation. :)

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  17. Urg! I had similar wonky edge issues with a blanket this week. But I'm with you on this one - I reckon it will block out and still be usable! :) x

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Thank you so much for visiting my world. I love reading your comments and I do my utterly best to respond to questions and sweet messages. Thank you again for popping by.

Kärlek
Annette

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